City Paper Widget

Monday, October 20, 2014

Historic Preservation Website Reboot Creates Hundreds of Broken Links, Vanished Information

Without any apparent announcement or press release that I could find, DC's Historic Preservation Review Board (HPRB) and its mother agency, the Office of Planning (OP), have redesigned HPRB's web presence. The result, as of this writing, is that hundreds of hyperlinks that formerly led to HPRB informational web pages and official documents, from its welcome page to scores of staff reports, now lead to a default "page not found" page (see screenshot below). In addition, I am unable to find any information on the HPRB website about Board meetings before September 2014.

A Google Search for HPRB yields this
A email request for information from HPRB about the broken links and removed information was not answered as of this writing. The email request was made before opening of business three days ago, Friday, October 17.

In addition, Google searches for "HPRB" or "Historic Preservation Review Board" also lead to the default "page not found" page, as of this writing.

This page advises, among other things, to visit the Office of Planning at the following URL: http://www.op.dc.gov/ . However, this URL does not lead to a functioning web page.

However, there is a link on the page that reads "Historic Preservation" on the upper left of the same page. This link leads to the new HPRB web presence.

In the HPRB's new "Agendas & Reports" page, no longer has information prior to September 2014. Before the reboot, this HPRB page contained information going back to 2010 -- see this archived page of the old HPRB website from Internet Archive's Wayback Machine.

Hyperlinks to HPRB documents, especially staff reports, from many local blogs and other sources now lead to dead links. A short Internet search lead me to find broken links to HPRB documents at the web site of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2B/Dupont Circle (the broken link is located on this page) and at the following blogs that report on HPRB activity:
In each case above, the hyperlink leads to the page with the broken link.

Dozens of links to HPRB-related stories I have written about on this blog in the
last 14 months are now also dead.

Finally, the abbreviated URL (tinyurl.com/887zoy8) that HPRB posts on its mandatory public placarding (see example left), which promises a web page where people unfamiliar with the process can get information about historic preservation review, also leads to the unhelpful "page not found" page.

HPRB announced a pilot program of public placarding of historic preservations projects in March -- see SALM blog post of March 28. I first noticed actual placards appearing in public in September -- see SALM blog post of September 2.

I would appreciate comments or emails from anyone who can help me make sense of the HPRB website redesign and/or help me re-link articles to now-difficult-to-find HPRB information.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Interview with William K. Smith, Candidate for ANC2A district 04

This is a written interview with William K. Smith, who is running for Commissioner of district 04 of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2A/Foggy Bottom.

Smith's opponent is Thomas Martin. An interview with Martin was published yesterday.

District 04 is the district in the lower left corner of the map at right. It includes the Watergate complex and the Kennedy Center, but also some residential streets.

Don't know your ANC district? There are two search tools: one by the DC government, the other by Code for DC.

– Where can people go to find out who you are and what you stand for?

They can contact me directly at smith4ANC2014@gmail.com, or they can visit my website: http://www.william-kennedy-smith.com. I am happy to available to neighbors and residents. My office is at 600 New Hampshire Ave NW and my campaign phone number is 202-803-1978.

– What is your daytime job? What skills have you acquired at that job that will help you be an effective ANC?

Well, I am a board certified physiatrist, which is to say, I am a rehab doc. Rehabilitation medicine is the only branch of medicine that is not organized around an organ system, e.g. lungs, heart, brain. It is organized around a philosophy of management, the team approach. A physiatrist anchors a team that includes, nurses, therapists, social workers and technicians all of whom work together in helping the patient achieve the highest level of function and independence possible. This is directly applicable to work on the ANC because ANC members really have no independent authority or power. They work by exerting influence and marshaling teamwork.

Currently, I am CEO of MedRed, a medical software company located right here in the ANC District. Last year, when the Veterans Administration (VA) put out a challenge to industry to help solve VA’s medical scheduling challenges, a lot of big companies, like HP, Google, Talend and Medsphere responded, but our small company beat out 40 other entrants to finish first in the contest. I like solving problems.

For many years I also worked in grass roots movements internationally. I founded Physicians Against Land Mines, which was part of the Nobel Prize winning International Campaign to Ban Land Mines. I was a founding steering committee member of the International Disability Caucus, which worked with member states to negotiate the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. In my life and in my work I have always enjoyed working with diverse groups and interests toward a meaningful goal. I hope to carry that forward to my work with the ANC. I believe I can contribute to the Foggy Bottom community.

– For many people who live in your district, routine shopping means walking many blocks heavy-laden with shopping bags. What can the ANC can do to attract more retail in your district?

Shopping patterns in the area have changed. Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods are great additions, but the loss of the Safeway was a real blow to many folks who have limited access to transportation and are shopping on a budget. Initiatives like the supermarket shuttle, which ANC Commissioner Armando Irizarry was instrumental in getting and keeping, are incredibly important in ensure access to affordable shopping for seniors. Also, my wife and I are members of the Foggy Bottom West End Village: http://www.fbwevillage.org/. It was launched in October, 2013 and its volunteers “join with neighbors to give a ride, grocery shop, take a walk, share a special skill, attend lectures, share stories and have fun! Services are provided through a cadre of volunteers, directed by a full-time Director of Volunteer and Village Services.” It is a great program that we need to support. Initiatives like these can improve accessibility to area amenities, but overall, retail in the area will continue to reflect the health and character of the neighborhood. That is and will continue to be a central concern of the ANC as expressed through zoning, licensing and other initiatives.

– Parking is always a hassle all over DC. How can the city reconcile the desire of residents for no-cost parking on the streets in front of their homes with the fact that it is impossible to provide free on-street parking for everybody who wants it?

I have lived in cities most of my life. New York, Chicago, Washington D.C., I have never seen one where parking was not a source of frustration. Public transportation, bicycles and car sharing services can help, but I do think that zoning some residential parking within neighborhoods and giving residents an advantage improves the quality of life.

– Some of the properties in your district, and many properties in the ANC, are part of one historic district of another. What's your position on the role of Historic Preservation in Foggy Bottom? Is it too much of a hassle for homeowners to modify their own homes?

I live in a Coop, not a house, but I served on the Watergate West Coop board and am very interested in the issue. I will listen carefully to those who are living it. I will say that I believe history is incredibly important and truly one of the great resources of this community. That said, there are plenty of examples in Europe and here in the U. S. where truly historic buildings have been renovated and modified in a ways that preserve the past and enhance the present. My wife is heavily involved in just such a project here in DC, the renovation of the Franklin School on 13th and K. The trick is to make sure that regulation designed to protect historic buildings does not wind up strangling them in the process. The challenge is greatest for small homeowners who can get lost and paralyzed in a maze of regulation. I believe the ANC can be a useful champion for them.

– DC won't be a family-friendly city until the school system gets fixed. There seems to have been some progress on elementary schools, but now people are moving to the suburbs because the middle schools just don't measure up. What's the best way to attack the problem of improving middle schools?

Over the years, I personally have had exposure to the VSA Arts program founded by my mother, Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith. It is now housed at the Kennedy Center and VSA's national and international affiliates work in arts-related special education programs in the District and all the states. The model of institutions like the Kennedy Center affiliating with, and providing assistance to, public schools is one that I think could really be expanded in D.C. If you start to think of the District’s public institutions as educational resources you can see the incredible potential. The Kennedy Center, National Gallery, Smithsonian, Library of Congress, National Archives, even the Department of Education, the list goes on and there is no suburban area in the country can match it. So, we should help break down the walls and expand the partnership. All these institutions have some educational profile. I know leadership at many of them and believe they would welcome a chance to expand it locally. With some encouragement and coordination these institutions could become much more meaningful partners with district schools. Don’t get me wrong, improving the quality of schools is not a simple matter. It will take a combination of educational reform, along with a sustained investment of time, community engagement and resources but the payoff in terms of our tax base, economic vitality, and overall quality of life is something no one disputes. While the ANC may not be the logical epicenter of education reform, simple, well-executed ideas and local partnerships can make a difference. That is what I hope to bring to the ANC.

– Is there anything I should have asked you but didn't?

Why are you running?

I have lived, on and off, in DC for nearly 14 years and have had a home in Watergate West for the past 10, now with my wife and 2 children. My medical software business, MedRed, is also located in the single member district. When I received a note from current ANC Commissioners Armando Irizarry, Florence Harman and Rebecca Coder indicating that Armando was not seeking re-election, I spoke with my wife and we decided that this was an important way that I could serve this community. I spoke with a number of friends on the ANC and in the neighborhood and they urged me to run.

I admire Armando, what he was able to accomplish and the way in which he conducted himself and so I am very honored that he has endorsed my candidacy. I have been involved in volunteer and charitable service for most of my life. After completing my medical residency I spent years working with polytrauma programs in war-affected countries like Angola, Bosnia, El Salvador and many others. I also devoted time to working with disability groups on rights issues in many countries around the globe. During Operation Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom my focus shifted more to working with war wounded programs closer to home, at Walter Reed and the VA. Since moving to Foggy Bottom, I have served on the Coop Board at Watergate West and now would like to continue to provide volunteer service to the community in which I live. A commitment to public service, a wealth of experience and a network of friends are some of the building blocks I plan to use to make a contribution to the ANC and Foggy Bottom.

End of interview

The election will take place on Tuesday, November 4. Early voting will start Saturday, October 25 Monday, October 20. Thanks to all candidates for responding to my questions.

Cheater's Guide to Dream City -- Part 21 (Resurrection)

This is the twenty-first installment of a series (see the first installment here) summarizing the 1994 book Dream City: Race, Power, and the Decline of Washington, D.C.by Harry Jaffe and Tom Sherwood. This book has recently been republished as an ebook and a paper book. HBO has plans to use material from the book to make a movie about the life of Marion Barry.

Chapter 16: Resurrection (three of three)

Marion Barry was released from a Pennsylvania jail on April 23, 1992.

Hundreds of people, including his mother, escorted him back to DC on buses. “The five buses pulled up to the Union Temple Church in Anacostia at 8:00 p.m. and hundreds of screaming, chanting supporters exploded in ’Barry’s back, Barry’s back, Barry’s back’ “ (Kindle location 5536).

“A few weeks later, Marion Barry moved into a small apartment in Ward Eight to establish residency and start running for the council seat that would be filled by voters on September 15 -- four months down the line.... In Barry’s eyes, still guided by tremendous political instincts, it was a natural fit: the outlaw candidate for the outcast ward” (l. 5542).

“Ward Eight was the only place in the city that Barry could have hoped to start a political comeback. He's always tapped into the anger in the black community, and there's plenty there -- for good reason” (l. 5543).

“It is the city's poorest Ward. The median income is $16,000. According to city statistics, 15,000 people live in public housing and another 10,000 live in subsidized apartments, so that 35 percent of the population qualifies for government help. Forty-one percent didn't graduate from college. In the midst of a homelessness crisis, there are 5,000 vacant housing units, and at least 1,700 are boarded up. In comparison, there are five boarded-up units in Ward Three, where the whites dwell” (l. 5551).

“ ’This isn't a campaign,’ [Barry] preached in his kickoff speech, ’this is a crusade to bring power and dignity and services back to us here in Ward Eight’ “ (l. 5567).

“ ’I’ll tell you why Marion Barry’s running,’ said Absalom Jordan, a Ward Eight activist who was also running for the council seat. ’He wants to run for mayor again in two years. It's that simple’ “ (l. 5575).

“ ’His premise is that people have short memories,’ said Absalom Jordan, ’and he can keep playing the race game again and again. He says “look at what the white man did to me.” He wants people to forget that for years he was the white man, he was the law, he was in control of the city...’ “ (l. 5595).

“On September 15, a record number of Ward Eight voters elected Marion Barry over [opponent Wilhelmina] Rolark by a 3-1 margin. Victory was his, and it was sweet” (l. 5604).

“Many people were mystified that he'd won, but the reasons were clear. Neighborhoods with terrific views of the sparkling lights on the Mall and the national monuments were breeding grounds for violence and drug addiction. Why Barry? Because no one else had helped them. They had no better choices. At least he could bring some attention. He could bring some hope” (l. 5611).

1992 also brought Bill Clinton to the White House. “...Clinton’s greatest impact was to give hope to Washingtonians who wanted the District of Columbia to become the state of New Columbia. Statehood is the holy grail of Washington politics....Clinton was the first president who publicly supported the District’s becoming the fifty-first state; he'd even testified on its behalf early in 1992" (l. 5620).

“Unfortunately, Mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly didn't do much to help the District’s case. Kelly used statehood as a political weapon, blaming Congress for the city’s problems and leading people to believe that all would be fine if Congress would grant statehood. It was pure demagoguery.... Kelly’s campaign only served to make enemies in Congress. As Kelly dangled statehood in front of the city, the prospect that Congress would appoint a federal financial oversight commission was much more likely” (l. 5643).

“On Inauguration Day, January 20, 1993, when the capital city was in the spotlight of the world for a swearing in of a new president, the mayor had her aides changing the locks to doors to keep council members away from choice seats to view the parade from the city's District Building” (l. 5656).

“The city council job was a cakewalk for [Marion Barry]. He'd already been a councilman for four years before he was mayor, and he knew the executive branch better than anyone in the city. He had virtually created it. In private working sessions and public committee meetings, Barry applied himself to the task of representing his ward. he was studious and conscientious, asked intelligent questions, and cooperated with the other twelve council members” (l. 5673).

“In fact, he could hardly get his mind off a total comeback. The next election would be in September 1994. He could run for mayor and not give up his council seat, so there would be no risk. He loved campaigning more than anything else and he could parlay the threat of running to gain favors from Kelly or other council members. Kelly appeared to be weak. If another candidate or two got into the race and split the vote, even Barry’s most vitriolic detractors had to admit that he had a real chance to win the Democratic primary” (l. 5696).

“Many felt another Barry campaign would be bad for him personally, bad for business, and bad for the city. It was time for other challenges. Barry should let go. They shared some of their feelings with him, but just as in his race for Ward Eight council seat, Marion Barry had his own sense of timing, his own vision” (l. 5707).

Cheater's Guide to Dream City continues next week

Further installments will appear on successive Fridays. All posts will be cross-posted on the ad-hoc "Cheater's Guide to Dream City" blog.

Full disclosure: I have a commercial relationship with Amazon. I will receive a very small portion of the money people spend after clicking on an Amazon link on this site.

This is a great book and well worth reading in its entirety.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Interview with Thomas B. Martin, Candidate for ANC2A district 04

This is a written interview with Thomas B. Martin, who is running for Commissioner of district 04 of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2A/Foggy Bottom.

Martin's opponent is William K. Smith. Read an interview with Smith here.

District 04 is the district in the lower left corner of the map at right. It includes the Watergate complex and the Kennedy Center, but also some residential streets.

Don't know your ANC district? There are two search tools: one by the DC government, the other by Code for DC.


– Where can people go to find out who you are and what you stand for?




– What is your daytime job? What skills have you acquired at that job that will help you be an effective ANC?

http://gmpllp.com/portfolio-view/thomas-martin/

I am a founding partner at a DC law firm. We represent businesses and nonprofits with DC-specific issues. We are a one-stop shop for DC business legal needs from commercial real estate leases, to litigation, to permits and lobbying. The skills I would bring to ANC would be a familiarity with DC agencies and government personnel. Most importantly, I understand and regularly help my clients navigate the DC bureaucracy. Sometimes that means negotiating and sometimes it means litigating. I think I am effective in building coalitions and moving efficiently and strategically to accomplish goals. I hope to be able to put those skills to work as an ANC Commissioner.

– For many people who live in your district, routine shopping means walking many blocks heavy-laden with shopping bags. What can the ANC can do to attract more retail in your district?

My campaign is focused on solving the problem of the dearth of commercial outlets that serve the entire neighborhood. We have a lot of seniors in my Single Member District (SMD) and closing the Safeway at Watergate, along with several other stores has created an unnecessary burden for too many. While the ANC does not have control over the commercial space at the Watergate, I would move the ANC to engage with the Board at Watergate East and its management partner to encourage economic development at the Watergate. Specifically, there needs to be a grocery store with fresh produce and national brands. There also need to be stores that compliment anchor tenants CVS and (hopefully) a new grocery store. Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s are good for the neighborhood, but the market can definitely bear an alternative to these two stores. That alternative should be in my SMD so that it is convenient and affordable for seniors. Further, the route to get there must be safe and accessible for people in wheelchairs and people with strollers.

– Parking is always a hassle all over DC. How can the city reconcile the desire of residents for no-cost housing on the streets in front of their homes with the fact that it is impossible to provide free on-street parking for everybody who wants it?

I think the market is demanding reconciliation in one of two ways – either pay for a parking space behind home or in a garage, or rely on a bicycle or public transportation. I see the use of shared cars and rides increasing. Metro has been extended to Reston, and I see a reduced reliance on the automobile. I think the importance/reliance on cars is changing as the Millennials come of age. They seem to be less enamored with cars than my generation (Gen X) and those before me. To your question, in my SMD it’s impossible to have street parking for everyone who wants it.

– Some of the properties in your district, and many properties in the ANC, are part of one historic district of another. What's your position on the role of Historic Preservation in Foggy Bottom? Is it too much of a hassle for homeowners to modify their own homes?

Historic Preservation is important. I do not think it is too much of a hassle to have ANC involvement when an owner proposes to modify her/his home. Quiet enjoyment of one’s property is the most important thing to Foggy Bottom residents. I think the prospect of McMansions is disturbing to many who understand and respect the neighborhood and its history. That is why there is this review of proposed modifications.

– DC won't be a family-friendly city until the school system gets fixed. There seems to have been some progress on elementary schools, but now people are moving to the suburbs because the middle schools just don't measure up. What's the best way to attack the problem of improving middle schools?

Me and my wife have been very involved with the neighborhood school, Francis Stevens. We are one of those families that is committed to staying in town and helping to improve the public schools for all students. The middle schools will improve as groups of committed families keep their kids in the system through elementary through middle school. In the intervening years before those large groups of students come through, DCPS has got to work to standardize best practices among the middle schools. I believe the Chancellor is doing a good job as she attempts to mold and improve what was a broken public school system. But, the schools will not improve unless families commit to keeping their children in the system while actively working to improve the system. From our experience, active engagement of the parents with the administration and teachers is essential. If elected to the ANC, one of the things I want to do is engage our neighborhood on increasing involvement with the neighborhood school. In our SMD we have a wealth of diplomats, entrepreneurs, and every kind of professional. I would like to see the opportunities for increased volunteerism at Francis Stevens. We could have a mentor program that is the envy of the city. Further, the Foggy Bottom community should engage with the school since it will be remodeled soon. There may be the opportunity to create neighborhood meeting space and/or amenities at Francis Stevens. If elected I can facilitate that neighbor-school communication.

– Is there any questions that I should have asked you but didn't?

None.

End of interview.

The election will take place on Tuesday, November 4. Early voting will start Saturday, October 25 Monday, October 20. Thanks to all candidates for responding to my questions.

SALM to Moderate 14th and U Candidates' Forum Tonight

There will be a candidates' forum tonight for contested Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) seats in the vicinity of 14th and U Streets NW.  The forum will start at 7pm at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th Street). It is sponsored by the Shaw Dupont Citizens Alliance and the Meridian Hill Neighborhood Association, and will include candidates vying for district 09 of ANC 2B/Dupont Circle and district 12 of ANC 1B/U Street. I will moderate.

Katherine Gordon, a uncontested candidate for a seat in ANC 2F/Logan Circle, was invited but cannot attend. She is out of town.

For more information, see SALM blog post of October 8.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Interview with Kevin Cain, Candidate for ANC1B District 04

This is a written interview with Kevin Cain, who will be the only candidate to appear on the ballot in district 04 of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 1B/U Street. The seat is currently held by Deborah Thomas, who is not running for re-election.

Cain seems to have no opposition, but he agreed to answer a list of questions anyway. My thanks to Cain.

District 04 is bordered by 12th Street NW on the east and 15th Street on the west. The southern border is V Street. The northern border is mostly Florida Avenue, but it takes a slight jog north, between 13th and 14th Streets, up to Belmont Street. See middle left of map.

Don't know your ANC district? There are two search tools: one by the DC government, the other by Code for DC.

Where can your future constituents go to find out more about you? How will they be able to contact you with concerns once you start serving as Commissioner?

My contact information is available on my website, at http://www.kcainanc1b04.com/ as well as through my Facebook page, Kevin Cain ANC 1B04. My goal is to be very accessible and responsive to my friends and neighbors who make up 1B04, and to keep them informed of important developments that affect quality of life in our community.

– What is the biggest problem in the neighborhood?

Growth is both an opportunity and a challenge for our neighborhood. The entire U Street corridor is one of the fastest growing, ever-changing and most diverse areas in the city, which is the reason that many of us moved here. We need to continue to promote a dynamic and vibrant community. However, rapid growth and change can also bring challenges. Different residents and business owners can have different visions for the future of our neighborhood. My goal is to listen to the people of ANC 1B04, to understand their needs and to work with them to ensure the benefits of growth are broadly shared.

– What, if anything, can the ANC do to improve on-street parking? Your district has both a residential and a retail component. How can the conflict interests of merchants and homeowners in this case be satisfied?


I think we have to take a comprehensive approach that includes settlement agreements with businesses, a better relationship with the District Department of Transportation (DDOT), and a frank conversation with both businesses and residents about parking restrictions and violations. Businesses certainly have a need for customers, but they do not have the right to “reserve” or cordon off public parking areas, which has become a fairly common occurrence in some areas. At the same time, residents need clear signage and fair enforcement. I also believe that ANCs should continue to push for additional parking in developments, and potentially even parking garages as the area continues to grow. It may be difficult for us to create any legal restrictions, but we can certainly make our voices heard.

– Your district has several liquor licensees, and many neighbors of liquor licensees. What is your opinion, generally, of liquor license protests, both by the ANC and by neighboring groups?

One of the reasons that I ran for this position originally was my opposition to the recently proposed liquor license moratorium. I spoke out against it at the ANC hearing on the issue, and I think the 80 to 1 ratio in opposition was fairly indicative of the neighborhood. I also believe that the current DC code allowing for only five people to file these types of protests is out of date and should be revisited. As a commissioner, I plan to listen to both sides of disagreements. When bad actors are identified, they need to be held accountable, through license protests or settlement agreements. But we need to do it on a case by case basis, since every situation is different.

– Urban planners say increased density is good, but nobody wants to have more tall buildings or pop-ups next door. Is the city heading in the right direction with recent proposals to limit development, especially in rowhouse areas?

You bring up a very good point, and one that I do not think the city is addressing very well. I would like to see a comprehensive plan that addresses not only the height restrictions, but also the mandatory number of parking spaces. To lessen congestion in the city, we must take vehicles off the road, and the only way to do that is to increase density, particularly near Metro stations and other areas with public transportation. We simply cannot have a greener, less polluted city without increasing, not decreasing, the height restrictions. These are the tradeoffs that every world class city has to make.

– Your district is a stone's throw from the Reeves Center. What's your position on the land swap? What can the ANC do to represent the interests of the neighborhood and its residents in this matter?

I favor the land swap, and I think redevelopment of the Reeves Center site is a good thing for the neighborhood. I do have some concerns about the current plan, however. One of the great amenities of our neighborhood is the weekend farmers market on the plaza at the Reeves Center, and I believe that any development should include some form of public space that allows the market to continue. I also believe that the ANC should continue working with any developers to encourage more day time foot traffic in the area with the type of ground floor retail that is chosen for the new site.

– Is there any question I should have asked but didn't?

No, I am hopeful that any of my potential constituents is comfortable reaching out to me on any issue, and I will be happy to respond.

End of interview

ANC1B, in addition to U Street, includes all or part of the following neighborhoods: Columbia Heights, LeDroit Park, Pleasant Plains, Shaw, University Heights, and lower Georgia Avenue.

The election will take place on Tuesday, November 4. Thanks to all candidates who responded to my questions.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

ANC Election Forums Tonight, Thursday

There will be an Advisory Neighborhood Committee (ANC) candidates' forum tonight, Tuesday, October 16, 7pm, at the Chastleton Ballroom (1701 16th Street NW), sponsored by ANC 2B/Dupont Circle and featuring aspiring members of that commission.

Dupont Village President Iris Molotsky and historic preservation architect Michael Beidler will moderate the forum.

On Thursday, there will be a forum for candidates from three different ANC districts at or near the intersection of U and 14th Streets. It will start at 7pm at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th Street). See SALM blog post of October 8 for more information.